Monthly Archives: December 2016

How to estimate the typical costs of wood flooring

There’s no doubt wood floors are the perfect choice for the modern home. Hard wearing and beautiful, they add character and value to your property and can be laid anywhere.

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Solid wood vs engineered wood

Solid wood is the most expensive option, and also the most durable. However, good quality engineered wood is almost indistinguishable from the real thing and can be sanded and refinished a number of times.

Both types of flooring come in a wide range of wood species. Oak and walnut are popular choices, but the right flooring for you will depend on the effect you want to create, and the areas where it will be used.

Once you’ve decided on your flooring, it pays to shop around. Prices for solid wood flooring can vary considerably online – try a site like http://www.ukflooringdirect.co.uk/solid-wood-flooring and then compare prices around the web.

Underlay

You’ll need underlay and a damp proof membrane if you’re laying flooring over concrete or anywhere damp may be a problem. Remember to calculate these costs in your final figures.

Fitting

Costs for fitting vary, although you can do the job yourself if you choose click lock flooring. The general rule of thumb is to double the price per square metre to include fitting and accessories.

Grades and finishes

Lacquered flooring is easier to maintain and has a sheen, whereas oiled flooring is more expensive per square metre and has a desirable matt finish. Unfinished wood is cheaper, but finished wood is ready to use as soon as it’s laid. Wood grades run from rustic to prime, and better grades are more expensive. The wider the planks you choose, the more expensive your flooring will be per square metre.

Added extras

The wood strips used to finish the edges of a room can add hundreds of pounds to your total costs, so if you’re on a tight budget consider lifting and replacing the skirting boards to hide the expansion gap.

Calculate your costs

Measure your room accurately, then multiply the length by the width to get the square meterage of the room. If it’s a more complicated shape, break down into rectangles and measure each one. You always need to add wastage to your calculations so add 5% for a standard room and 8% for a room with a less straightforward floor plan.